The Summit of Wildcat Mountain


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Wildcat Mountain

Attempting to bushwhack in the Coastal Mountains of Oregon is a humbling experience due to the dense rain forest. Most of the potential hikes are on logging roads. Many of the roads are closed by a gate, but accessible by hikers.

In early December, I did a 10-mile out-and-back hike to the top of Wildcat Mountain. As the crow flies, the summit is about 30 miles west of home.

The skies were mostly cloudy with temperatures in the lower 30s. The weather forecaster predicted showers by noon and she was spot on.

The logging road steadily climbed until coming to a large rock quarry. The upper area had been an active logging operation, but appeared to have been shut down earlier in the fall.

After doing some exploration, I climbed a steep track to the summit.

I could see the hazy summits of Mt. St. Helens, Mt. Adams and Mt. Hood. The little town of Buxton was mostly covered in fog below me.

One of these times I’m going to be on the summit on a crystal clear day. The vistas would be magnificent.

Mt. St. Helens above the town of Buxton

Springboard slot from long ago

The “Trail” (like all logging roads, every .5 miles is clearly marked which is always jolting to see)

Logging equipment near the summit

Long look down to Buxton, Oregon

Many signs of old logging operations

Trail sign at beginning of hike

Large, old stump among the Sword Ferns and Doug Firs

Gate blocking vehicle entrance to hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: Oregon Coastal Mountain HikingTags:

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