A Late Springtime Hike to a Wilderness Peak


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Into the Wilderness

On a late spring day I drove to the north side of Trapper Creek Wilderness, a nine square-mile designated wilderness in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest.

It was 37 degrees and overcast with a constant stream of drizzle from the skies. There goes the spectacular views of five snow-covered Cascade volcanoes I said to myself.

But, an ardent Northwest adventurer is never deterred by a little rain.

Old-growth Mountain Hemlocks

I hiked to two interesting destinations – – – 4,200-foot Observation Peak and 4,300-foot Sister Rocks.

After reaching the summit of Observation Peak, an old fire lookout site, I spent time photographing the few wildflowers in bloom. The open, rocky summit is always a dandy spot for wildflowers.

Next I hiked to neighboring Sister Rocks. There was still some snow on the trail in places.

Other than some fresh bear sign, and passing several hikers on the way back, I had the wilderness to myself.

Cliff Penstemon

“View” from Observation Peak

Avalanche Lilies and Trillium after lots of rainfall

Into the Wilderness

Wallflower and a soggy Agoseris

Ess-shaped tree a sure sign of heavy winter snows

Huckleberry, Oregon Anemone and Spreading Phlox

Mt. St. Helens from Sister Rocks from a previous hike on a much nicer day

 

 

 

Categories: Washington Cascades HikesTags: , , ,

5 comments

  1. Thank you so much for the photos and a virtual walk to a wilderness peak. A beautiful, natural reprieve from all of this Coronavirus and political unrest! I WISH I lived near a wilderness area like this, where I could go and walk–and not worry about being 6 feet apart and wearing a mask on a hot summer day.

    Like

  2. I have never seen those 2 flowers before and they are very interesting to look at, especially the avalanche lilies. Thanks for the post.

    Like

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